Microsoft Virtual Machine Converter 3.0 is here!

by Shijaz Abdulla on 15.10.2014 at 20:42

The Microsoft Virtual Machine Converter 3.0 (MVMC 3.0) is now publicly available and is overflowing with new features.

  1. The biggest new feature in MVMC 3.0 is online physical to virtual (P2V) conversion.
  2. Converts virtual disks that are attached to a VMware virtual machine to virtual hard disks (VHDs) that can be uploaded to Microsoft Azure.
  3. Provides native Windows PowerShell capability that enables scripting and integration into IT automation workflows.
  4. Supports conversion and provisioning of Linux-based guest operating systems from VMware hosts to Hyper-V hosts.
  5. Supports conversion of offline virtual machines.
  6. Supports the new virtual hard disk format (VHDX) when converting and provisioning in Hyper-V in Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows Server 2012.
  7. Supports conversion of virtual machines from VMware vSphere 5.5, VMware vSphere 5.1, and VMware vSphere 4.1 hosts Hyper-V virtual machines.
  8. Supports Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2012 and Windows 8 as guest operating systems that you can select for conversion.

Supported Configurations for Converting Virtual Machines

VMware sources:   

  • VMware vSphere 5.5 (VMware ESXi 5.5)
  • VMware vSphere 5.1 (VMware ESXi 5.1)
  • VMware vSphere 4.1 (VMware ESXi/ESX 4.1)
  • VMware vCenter Server 5.5
  • VMware vCenter Server 5.1
  • VMware vCenter Server 4.1

Destination host servers:                        
Note   Hyper-V must be enabled.   

  • Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard
  • Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
  • Windows Server 2012 Standard
  • Windows Server 2012 Enterprise
  • Windows Server 2012 Datacenter
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard with Service Pack 1 (SP1)
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise with Service Pack 1 (SP1)
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter with Service Pack 1 (SP1)

Operating systems that are supported for which MVMC can be installed:   

  • Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard
  • Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
  • Windows Server 2012 Standard
  • Windows Server 2012 Enterprise
  • Windows Server 2012 Datacenter
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard with Service Pack 1 (SP1)
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise with Service Pack 1 (SP1)
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter with Service Pack 1 (SP1)

Microsoft Operating systems that are supported for conversion to Hyper-V from physical, or VMware virtual machines  

  • Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard x64
  • Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter x64
  • Windows Server 2012 Standard x64
  • Windows Server 2012 Datacenter x64
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard x64
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise x64
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter x64
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1
  • Windows Server 2008 Standard (x86/x64)
  • Windows Server 2008 Enterprise (x86/x64)
  • Windows Server 2008 Datacenter (x86/x64)
  • Windows 8 Enterprise (x86/x64)
  • Windows 8 Pro (x86/x64)
  • Windows 7 Enterprise (x86/x64)
  • Windows 7 Professional (x86/x64)
  • Windows 7 Ultimate (x86/x64)
  • Windows Vista Enterprise x86/x64

Linux operating systems that are supported for conversion from VMware virtual machines:   

  • Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® 6 (x86/x64)
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 (x86/x64)
  • Ubuntu 12.04 (x86/x64)
  • Ubuntu 10.04 (x86/x64)
  • SUSE® Linux Enterprise Server 11 (x86/x64)
  • CentOS 6 (x86/x64)
  • CentOS 5 (x86/x64)
  • Debian GNU/Linux 7 (x86/x64)
  • Oracle Linux 6 (x86/x64)
  • Oracle Linux 5 (x86/x64)

VMware still ships Easter Eggs in vSphere!

by Shijaz Abdulla on 08.06.2014 at 13:29

It is not a new thing from VMware to ship Easter Eggs in their products. Numerous versions of vSphere shipped with those. While that may have been cute in 1995, we live in a very different, very connected world where this doesn’t pass muster.

clip_image002

How cute.

Surely, in this post-Snowden world VMware wouldn’t have left Easter eggs in their Enterprise Class, Enterprise Cost vSphere 5.5. I mean, come on, the Pong Easter Egg has been publicly noted and the world is more sensitive about security than ever before. VMware got rid of this right?

Nope.

This still exists in vSphere 5.5 (!!!) and who know what other surprises are in there and what they haven’t disclosed in their security audits. So much for Enterprise Class. This is more like Fisher Price class.

This post was adapted from a piece originally written by: Jeff Woolsey, Principal Group Program Manager, Windows Server Virtualization.

Attention VMware customers

by Shijaz Abdulla on 02.10.2013 at 21:20

If you run Microsoft software on VMware, I care about you. Which is why I have dedicated this post for this very important public service announcement.

Issued in public interest by yours truly.

Microsoft has the “most ambitious cloud strategy”: Forbes

by Shijaz Abdulla on 25.02.2013 at 21:58

I read with interest an article on Forbes.com by Louis Columbus, titled Demystifying Cloud Vendors.

Louis shares his observations from a recent Gartner webinar titled How Cloud Computing changes the Vendor Landscape by David Mitchell, VP and Gartner Fellow.

Microsoft has the most ambitious cloud strategy of the nine companies profiled, and their cloud-first design initiative shows they have faith in Azure performing in the enterprise.  Microsoft Dynamics AX 2012 will first be released on Azure, then on-premise is a case in point. Microsoft is impatient  to move into a subscription model with its evolving cloud platform.

Gartner’s analysis of Microsoft’s cloud strategy is shown in the following graphic.

Microsoft-Cloud-Strategy 

Here is a summary chart showing Microsoft as having perfect balance between enabling technology and packaged cloud. Other major vendors on the list are Amazon, Google, Salesforce.com, IBM, VMware, HP, and Oracle among others.

Summary-Chart

For more information on how you can benefit from our cloud solutions, reach out to me or speak to your Microsoft account manager.

June 2012 Gartner Quadrant on Server Virtualization

by Shijaz Abdulla on 27.06.2012 at 10:48

Figure 1.Magic Quadrant for x86 Server Virtualization Infrastructure

Microsoft is a leader, right behind VMware on the June 2012 Magic Quadrant for x86 Server Virtualization released by Gartner.

But wait – in this magic quadrant, Gartner compares Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V and System Center 2007 with VMware vSphere 5. You can imagine what would be the outcome if they were to consider Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V and System Center 2012!!

What is also interesting to note, is about the cautions that Gartner have mentioned about Microsoft vs. VMware:

For Microsoft, the cautions are all around sales & marketing, such as penetrating VMware installed base and facing competition. For VMware, however, the caution is about customer concerns around vendor lock-in – specifically around the lack of support for heterogeneous environments, a strength in System Center 2012 that brings flexibility to customers.

Related Post: How Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V compares against VMware vSphere 5.0 Enterprise Plus

Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V: 1 million IO per second!

by Shijaz Abdulla on 26.06.2012 at 15:37

clip_image001

Jeff Woolsey, Principal Program Manager Lead at Microsoft, shared this glimpse from TechEd Europe 2012 that’s happening right now in Amsterdam. That’s Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V delivering over 1 million IOPs from a single virtual machine!

Indeed, a picture says a thousand words.

Windows Server 2012: 985,000 IOPS from a single Hyper-V VM!

by Shijaz Abdulla on 12.06.2012 at 22:17

Day one of TechEd North America saw something very spectacular.

During Satya Nadella’s keynote were a series of fascinating demos – here are a few that I especially liked that you should not miss:

985,000 IOPS from a single Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V VM

  • 4000 random IOs, Queue depth: 32, with 40 concurrent threads
  • At the same time, VMware maxes out at just 300,000 IOPs per VM, VMware needs 6 virtual machines to achieve the same feat!

Offloaded Data Transfer (ODX) – File copies of 1 GigaByte per second

  • Yes, copy a 10 GB file in 10 seconds – ODX is a SAN technology that works with Windows Server 2012

Other notable demos during the keynote.

  • Cisco Nexus 1000V virtual switch for Hyper-V
  • Runbook Automation with Hyper-V replica using PowerShell
  • Extending an on-premise private cloud to a service provider
  • 64 virtual processors inside a single virtual machine!

Click here to watch the keynote!

How Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V compares against VMware vSphere 5.0 Enterprise Plus

by Shijaz Abdulla on 02.06.2012 at 12:43

Windows Server 2012 Release Candidate (RC) marks a major milestone in Microsoft’s foray into the virtualization world. While Microsoft have always been leaders in management technologies, an area where VMware was weak, Microsoft now have the hypervisor which exceeds VMware capabilities.

Facts and Figures: Hyper-V vs. vSphere 5

Thought I’d share some interesting information from the recently released Competitive Advantages document.

System Resource Windows Server 2012 RC Hyper-V VMware ESXi 5.0 VMware vSphere 5.0 Enterprise Plus
Host Logical Processors

320

160

160

  Physical Memory

4 TB

32 GB

2 TB

  Virtual CPUs per host

2048

2048

2048

VM Virtual CPUs per VM

64

8

32

  Memory per VM

1 TB

32 GB

1 TB

  Active VMs per host

1024

512

512

  Guest NUMA

Yes

Yes

Yes

Cluster Maximum nodes

64

N/A

32

  Maximum VMs

4000

N/A

3000

Storage Virtual Fiber Channel

Yes

Yes

Yes

  MPIO

Yes

No

Yes (VAMP)

  Native 4-KB disk support

Yes

No

No

  Maximum Virtual Disk Size

64 TB VHDX

2 TB VMDK

2 TB VMDK

  Maximum pass through disk size

Varies

64 TB

64 TB

  Offloaded Data Transfer

Yes

No

Yes (VAAI)

VDI* Hardware GPU to vGPU support

Yes

No

No

  Software GPU support

Yes

Basic

Basic

  Remote Touch Support

Yes

No

No

  User Profile & Data Mgmt

Yes

No

No

Extensible Switch/Multi-tenancy

Extensible Network Switch

Yes

No

Yes

Confirmed Partner Extenstions

4

None

2

PVLAN

Yes

No

Yes

ARP/ND Spoofing Protection

Yes

No

vShield App/Partner

DHCP snooping/DHCP guard

Yes

No

vShield App/Partner

Virtual Port ACLs

Yes

No

vShield App/Partner

Trunk Mode to Virtual Machines

Yes

No

No

Port Monitoring

Yes

Per Port Group

Yes

Port Mirroring

Yes

Per Port Group

Yes

Mind-blowing, isn’t it?

*VDI comparisons were made taking VMware View into account.

Learn how to build and operate a Private Cloud

by Shijaz Abdulla on 28.04.2012 at 09:55

Over the past few days I have been reviewing e-learning content on Microsoft Virtual Academy (MVA). I was amazed by the wealth of training content available on MVA for the Private Cloud.

So, what is MVA?

imageMVA is a fully cloud-based learning experience focusing on Microsoft Cloud Technologies. MVA provides its users with a virtual university experience: the student can select a track and study the material and then do the self-assessment. Students on MVA can get access to all the information, statistics and advancements of their training career, allowing them to maintain a long-term relationship with Microsoft. Learning through MVA is free of charge, and you can study the contents at any time and at your own pace.

Configuring and Deploying Microsoft’s Private Cloud

After completing this private cloud specialization, you will have an understanding of Microsoft’s vision for cloud computing, from the business perspective to the technical level. The 8 modules are divided into four core courses covering:

1. Private Cloud: Infrastructure Management

  • Module 1: Configure and Deploy Private Cloud Infrastructure
  • Module 2: Monitor and Operate Private Cloud Infrastructure

2. Private Cloud: Infrastructure Components

  • Module 1: Configure and Deploy Infrastructure Components
  • Module 2: Monitor and Operate Infrastructure Components

3. Private Cloud: Service Delivery and Automation

  • Module 1:; Configure and Deploy Service Delivery & Automation
  • Module 2: Monitor and Operate Service Delivery & Automation

4. Private Cloud: Application Services Management

  • Module 1: Application Services Management, Configuration, & Deployment
  • Module 2: Application Services Management, Operation, & Management

image

During the 8 modules of this specialization, you will be introduced to all the elements of building the Microsoft private cloud. You’ll learn how to optimize and deploy the private cloud starting at the infrastructure layer. You’ll also be introduced to advanced virtualization management features and the concept and implementation of the System Center’s private cloud application service model.

After completing all of the modules you will have an understanding of:

  • How using Microsoft System Center 2012 can help you build, deploy and manage a private cloud infrastructure.
  • How System Center 2012 incorporates tools to deploy, update, and manage applications within your private cloud.
  • System Center 2012’s new abilities to deploy, update, and manage applications within your private cloud.
  • How using new components of System Center 2012, specifically the Orchestrator and Service Manager components, enable you to deploy, update, and manage service offerings within your private cloud.
  • How applications are deployed and managed in the Microsoft private cloud.
  • How to use new capabilities in System Center 2012 to deploy your applications as services.

I highly recommend this training for all IT Pros as an excellent means of updating your skills and build your readiness to face new challenges as cloud computing evolves.

IDC predicts: 2012 will be VMware’s last year as ‘King of the Hill’

by Shijaz Abdulla on 25.02.2012 at 11:43

IDC has predicted that 2012 will be VMware’s last year as ‘King of the Hill’.

With Windows Server 8, Hyper-V beats VMware not only in pricing but also in features. Even if VMware brought down pricing, Hyper-V still has features that VMware doesn’t.

And do not forget that System Center (the current version as well as 2012) has more mature and complete management features than VMware ever had, and the key to meaningful virtualization or realizing a private cloud lies in robust management tools.

MVP Aidan Finn wrote on his blog with a touch of humor:

And don’t forget that System Center (current and future) smack VMware’s “management” products around like a one-legged little person in a heavyweight MMA fight.

VMware fanboys and trolls please save yourselves the trouble, comments on this blog are moderated. Smile

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